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Checkered Flag

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Virginia Beach resident, Derick Reumel, waiting for flood waters to recede off of Shore Drive.
Photo Source: [The Sacramento Bee]

With all of the back-to-school sales going on this week, it is easy to get excited thinking about cool fall temperatures ahead.  Unfortunately, living here in Hampton Roads, we are all too well aware that the summer is nowhere near its end.  Crazy hot and humid days continue to be followed by spectacular firework-like lightning storms.  This past week we had temps over 100, flash flooding, and even funnel clouds.  If you're like me, you've been battening down the hatches, checking the batteries in the flashlights, and keeping an inventory of water and sunblock that the army would appreciate.
 
So, I'm sure you all have your homes and families equally weather-proofed, but what about your vehicles.  Mother Nature can take quite a toll on our four-wheeled friends during the summer, and although you may not be able to prevent your neighbor's tree from falling on your Checkered Flag Porsche convertible top, you can take some simple precautions and employ a little common sense.
 
Anyone that lives here in the seven cities area is certainly familiar with the term Flash Flooding.  One minute you're sitting in traffic on your way home jamming out to Mamma Mia soundtrack that you would never admit owning to your friends, and the next, you find yourself under a black sky and hear that unmistakable warning grumble of Tidewater thunder.
 
The skies open up and buckets upon buckets of rain dump down right on your path home.  Since a good portion of Hampton Roads is at or below sea level, we tend to have a bit of a problem with drainage.  Major roads and interstates flood within a matter of minutes?always during rush hour, of course.
 
Now, your brain starts to battle against itself.  "I know I shouldn't drive through puddles the size of lakes, but, if I don't get through, I won't make it home in time for Jeopardy."   Geez, what to do, what to do???  Then, your hungry tummy chimes in and your good senses have lost.  Somehow, you rationalize that if that Toyota Tundra in front of you just made it through, then certainly your Yaris  will be fine.  I mean, they're both made by the same people, and both are sold by Checkered Flag Toyota, so surely they have equal seaworthiness, right.  The next thing you know, you're in a spot like my sister in law earlier this year in Ghent, or my uncle just last week in Portsmouth, or the guy below who's in a whole mess of trouble in Ocean View.



Hampton Roads resident didn't quite make it through in Ocean View.
Photo Source: [CBS News]

I did a little research before starting on this article, and I have to say, I am flat out flabbergasted that there are people out there who honestly think that there are secret tricks to driving through water that will keep your vehicle safe.  My solution for this week's scenario is simple.  Automobiles are not boats.  Checkered Flag does not sell anything that is meant for deep puddle diving!  Keep them out of water!  We all have this common sense in us somewhere, but it needs to be exercised, people.

Do not park in areas that are clearly labeled as flood zones.  Yes, you may only be running in for five minutes, but that is all it takes to ruin your car.  I don't want to name names here, but there are certain places in Hampton Roads that have parking lots that flood on a regular basis (basically, anywhere near the Ghent area).  If a major storm is headed your way, park on the second or third floors of a parking garage.  The city of Norfolk often allows free parking in city garages during tropical storms and hurricanes.
 
When you are already on the road, avoid areas where you have witnessed standing water or flooding before.  If a route is unfamiliar, do not drive into standing water unless you are positive of its depth.  Most cars have a clearance of only 6 or 8 inches.  Even if the water seems only 2 or 3 inches deep, wake from other vehicles in the area can cause depth changes up to triple that height.
 
Either pull off the road onto higher ground, pull to the shoulder and wait for the water to recede (see top photo:  Virginia Beach resident Derick Reumel patiently waiting off of Shore Drive), or turn around and take an alternate route.  It may take you additional minutes to hours to get home, but think about it?is it worth a couple of thousand dollars?  Of course.
 
Flood damage can greatly depreciate the value of a vehicle.  This could amount to thousands of dollars' worth off of trade in value or resell value.  If you think you can just let the car dry out and everything will be fine, think again.  Even if your car runs fine after being flooded or stalling in water, there are tell-tale signs that will be obvious to a dealer or service technician.  If you have already made this mistake and want to minimize the loss in value, and make sure your vehicle keeps running smoothly, get into your Checkered Flag service center as soon as possible.  There are ways to repair damage you may not even know has been done to your engine before further problems arise. 

Categories: Checkered Flag, Local

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